Archive for the ‘News’ Category

THE ADDICTION MEDICINE FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES WINNERS OF NEXT GENERATION AWARDS FOR ADOLESCENT SUBSTANCE USE PREVENTION

THE ADDICTION MEDICINE FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES WINNERS OF NEXT GENERATION AWARDS FOR ADOLESCENT SUBSTANCE USE PREVENTION

THE ADDICTION MEDICINE FOUNDATION ACCREDITS FOUR MORE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMS, BRINGING TOTAL ACCREDITED PROGRAMS TO 40

THE ADDICTION MEDICINE FOUNDATION ACCREDITS FOUR MORE FELLOWSHIP
PROGRAMS, BRINGING TOTAL ACCREDITED PROGRAMS TO 40

ABMS Recognizes Addiction Medicine

ABMS Recognizes Addiction Medicine

 

 

 

AMERICAN BOARD OF ADDICTION MEDICINE FOUNDATION ACCREDITS NINE MORE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMS

Contact: Dennis Tartaglia
(732) 545-1848
dtartaglia@tartagliacommunications.com

For Immediate Release

AMERICAN BOARD OF ADDICTION MEDICINE FOUNDATION ACCREDITS NINE MORE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMS

Accredited Addiction Medicine Training Programs Grow to 36

Bethesda, Maryland – September 25, 2015 – The American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) Foundation today announced the accreditation of nine additional fellowship programs to train addiction medicine physicians. With the addition of these programs, the total number of Addiction Medicine Foundation accredited training programs has reached 36.

Risky substance use and addiction constitute America’s largest and most costly preventable health problem. Approximately 40 million people in the U.S. have the disease of addiction, yet only about one in 10 receive any form of treatment. Of those who are treated, few receive-evidence based care. To help draw attention to this need and expand training in addiction medicine the directors of the new programs, along with directors of existing and prospective fellowship programs, were recently invited to attend a White House symposium alongside leaders in graduate medical education, federal agencies, and supporting institutions.

The September 18 symposium, entitled “Medicine Responds to Addiction,” was cosponsored by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) and American College of Academic Addiction Medicine. Mr. Michael Botticelli, Director of the ONDCP, U.S. Surgeon General Vice Admiral Vivek H. Murthy, MD, MBA, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH, and American College of Academic Addiction Medicine President Patrick G. O’Connor, MD, MPH, FACP were among those who spoke with symposium participants about the importance of integrating addiction medicine competencies, from prevention through treatment and recovery, into graduate physician training, certification and practice.

“As was discussed at the White House symposium by so many national leaders, addiction is the nation’s number one public health problem and the need for physicians who are trained to prevent risky substance use and treat and manage addiction is enormous,” said Dr. O’Connor, who also serves as Professor of Medicine and Chief of the Section of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine. “We welcome the new fellowship programs, which will train this nation’s future addiction medicine leaders to provide evidence-based care.”

The fellowship programs, which are modeled on the Foundation’s national guidelines, Program Requirements for Graduate Medical Education in Addiction Medicine, are based at leading medical institutions across the U.S. and Canada. American College of Academic Addiction Medicine hopes to assist in establishing 125 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited addiction medicine fellowship programs by 2025.

The new fellowship programs are (sponsoring institutions and locations in parentheses): Georgia Regents University Addiction Medicine Fellowship (Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA); Institute for Family Health Fellowship in Addiction Medicine (Institute for Family Health, New York, NY); Largo Medical Center Fellowship Program in Addiction Medicine (Nova Southeastern University West Coast Academic Center, Largo, FL); Memorial Hermann Prevention and Recovery Center (Memorial Hermann Health System, Houston, TX); MultiCare Addiction Medicine Fellowship (MultiCare Good Samaritan Hospital, Puyallup, WA); UCSF Primary Care Addiction Medicine Fellowship (University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA); University of Calgary R3 Enhanced Skills in Addiction Medicine (University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine, Calgary, Alberta); URMC Combined Addiction Fellowship (Strong Memorial Hospital of the University of Rochester, Rochester, NY); and Virginia Commonwealth University Health System Addiction Medicine Fellowship (Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, VA).

American College of Academic Addiction Medicine fellowship programs provide one year of subspecialty training, which is offered to physicians already trained and certified in primary care specialties (internal medicine, family medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics & gynecology) and other specialties, such as preventive medicine and emergency medicine. Accrediting these training programs will help to assure the American public that addiction physician specialists have the knowledge and skills to prevent, recognize and treat addiction. It will also help ensure that trained physicians are available to address common medical or psychiatric conditions related to the use of addictive substances. While there are also addiction psychiatry fellowship programs that address the need for treatment within the specialty of psychiatry, there is a profound need for knowledge in addressing this disease and its prevention and treatment across primary care and in many areas of specialty care practice beyond psychiatry. The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has begun the formal process of bringing addiction medicine into the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) as a subspecialty available to diplomates from all medical fields.

Medical leaders participating in the September 18 symposium included representatives from American College of Academic Addiction Medicine, ABMS, ACGME, and primary care boards including internal medicine, pediatrics, family medicine, obstetrics & gynecology, as well as the boards for preventive medicine and emergency medicine. Federal agencies participating in the program included the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Health Resources and Services Administration, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Office of the Surgeon General, and Veterans Health Administration. Other participants included representatives of large government and private health systems, foundations and research organizations.

American College of Academic Addiction Medicine’s purpose is to establish and accredit addiction medicine training programs and support the advancement of the field and care of patients. The Foundation is governed by 18 distinguished physicians from a range of medical specialties. For more information, visit 61.12.77.244/ACAAM, call (301) 656-3378 or email kkunz@abam.net.

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WHITE HOUSE DRUG POLICY OFFICE HOSTS “MEDICINE RESPONDS TO ADDICTION” SYMPOSIUM

The White House
For Immediate Release


Watch video of the event here:
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Washington, D.C. –Today, Michael Botticelli, Director of National Drug Control Policy, hosted leaders in graduate medical training, federal agencies, supporting institutions and representatives of current and emerging addiction medicine fellowship training programs at the White House for a symposium entitled “Medicine Responds to Addiction.” The symposium intends to accelerate progress in the medical field to address substance use prevention and the treatment and management of addiction.

“America must bring the power of medicine and public health to bear to reduce substance use and its consequences,” said Director Botticelli. “Today’s symposium can help ensure that the next generation of physicians is well-equipped to bring an effective public health response to substance use disorders.”

Medical leaders participating in the symposium included representatives from The American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) Foundation, American Board of Medical Specialties, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), and primary care boards including Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Family Medicine, Obstetrics & Gynecology, as well as the boards for Preventive and Emergency Medicine.

“The house of medicine is truly shining a light today on addiction medicine and the urgent need for trained and certified specialists,” said Dr. Patrick G O’Connor, President of the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) Foundation.  “It is our hope that today’s meeting will result in a lasting structure for public-private collaboration in order to further develop the physician workforce to address our nation’s number one public health problem.”

Federal agencies participating in the program included the National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Health Resources and Services Administration,
National Cancer Institute, Office of the Surgeon General, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention and Veterans Health Administration. Other participants included representatives of large government and private health systems, foundations and research organizations.

Michael Botticelli, Director of National Drug Control Policy, U.S. Surgeon General Vice Admiral Vivek H. Murthy, MD, MBA, CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH, and Dr. O’Connor were among those who spoke with symposium participants about the importance of integrating addiction medicine competencies, from prevention through treatment and recovery, into graduate physician training, certification and practice.  Symposium participants also held a series of working sessions to discuss specific actions underway or planned in each supporting organization to further these goals.  A particular focus of the symposium was the inclusion in medical training and practice of methods to prevent substance use among young people and intervene early to avoid consequences.

Background on the Symposium

The meeting included representatives of three current and 17 prospective addiction medicine fellowship training programs from across the country.  Over the last seven years, American College of Academic Addiction Medicine has created addiction medicine fellowship programs at 36 medical schools and teaching hospitals across North America. The Foundation hopes to assist in establishing a total of 125 ACGME accredited fellowship programs by 2025.  The symposium participants from prospective sites have all committed to developing fellowship training programs in order to help build the trained and certified addiction medicine workforce.

The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has begun the formal process to bring addiction medicine into the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) as a subspecialty available to diplomates from all medical fields. There is a profound need for knowledge in addressing this disease and its prevention and treatment across primary care and in many areas of specialty care practice.

Substance use disorders are one of the largest preventable health problems facing our Nation, affecting 8.1 percent of the non-institutionalized population ages 12 and over in 2014 (21.5 million). In 2014, 22.5 million people in the United States needed treatment for a substance use disorder, and only 11.6% received treatment at a specialty facility for a substance use problem.

Hosted by Michael Botticelli, Director of National Drug Control Policy, the symposium was co-sponsored by the Office of National Drug Control Policy and The American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) Foundation, whose President is Patrick G. O’Connor, MD, MPH.

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THE ABAM FOUNDATION ACCREDITS FOUR MORE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMS

Contact:  Dennis Tartaglia
(732) 545-1848
dtartaglia@tartagliacommunications.com

For Immediate Release

AMERICAN BOARD OF ADDICTION MEDICINE CERTIFIES 651 NEW DIPLOMATES, AND THE ABAM FOUNDATION ACCREDITS FOUR MORE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMS

Total Board-Certified Addiction Medicine Physicians Reaches 3,363,  While Accredited Training Programs Grow to 27

Bethesda, Maryland – January 28, 2015 – The American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) today announced that 651 physicians passed its most recent addiction medicine certification examination, while American College of Academic Addiction Medicine accredited four additional fellowship programs to train new addiction medicine physicians. The number of newly certified addiction medicine specialists represents the largest group of physicians to be certified in a single year, bringing the total number of ABAM diplomates (physicians certified by ABAM) to 3,363. With the addition of the four new fellowship programs, the total number of Addiction Medicine Foundation accredited addiction medicine training programs has reached 27.

“The addiction medicine field is growing by leaps and bounds, and we are gratified to see that so many physicians have chosen to become ABAM certified in order to better prevent and treat the nation’s number one public health problem,” said Patrick G. O’Connor, MD, MPH, FACP, President of ABAM and American College of Academic Addiction Medicine, and Professor of Medicine and Chief of the Section of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine. “At the same time, we are happy to welcome the new fellowship programs, which will train North America’s future addiction medicine leaders. With so many physicians passing our rigorous examination, and so many completing this comprehensive clinical training, we are helping make evidence-based addiction prevention and treatment more readily available to those who need it.”

The fellowship programs, which are modeled on the Foundation’s national guidelines, Program Requirements for Graduate Medical Education in Addiction Medicine, are based at leading medical institutions across the U.S. and Canada. Accreditation of these new programs means that there are now 56 addiction medicine fellowship slots available each year. American College of Academic Addiction Medicine hopes to accredit 65 addiction medicine fellowship programs by 2020.

The new fellowship programs are the: University of Kentucky Addiction Medicine Fellowship Program (Lexington, KY); Caron-Reading Addiction Medicine Fellowship Program (Wernersville, PA); Oregon Health & Science University Addiction Medicine Fellowship (Portland, OR); and Rhode Island Hospital Addiction Medicine Fellowship (Providence, RI). (See table at end of this release for information on these programs, and detailed summaries of all Addiction Medicine Foundation fellowship programs at http://www.abam.net/2015_2016_admfellowships/

American College of Academic Addiction Medicine-accredited fellowship programs provide one and two year subspecialty training, which is offered to physicians already trained in primary care specialties (internal medicine, family medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology) and other specialties. Accrediting these and future training programs will help to assure the American public that addiction physician specialists have the knowledge and skills to prevent, recognize and treat addiction. It will also help ensure that trained physicians are available to address common medical or psychiatric conditions related to the use of addictive substances.

The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology offers fellowships in the psychiatry subspecialty of addiction psychiatry. There are 46 addiction psychiatry fellowship programs in the U.S. Prior to the establishment of ABAM and American College of Academic Addiction Medicine, psychiatrists were the only medical specialty that had board certification and sub-specialty fellowship training in addictions available to them.

The new class of ABAM diplomates represents the widest array of specialties yet – nearly 40 specialties and subspecialties in all. The new diplomates hail from 48 states, the District of Columbia and four Canadian provinces. They work in a broad array of health care settings, including government agencies, corrections, universities, private practices and hospitals, among others. Of note, the average age of new diplomates has dropped with each exam cycle since 2010. ABAM certification is valid for 10 years, and all successful examinees are automatically enrolled in the ABAM Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program.

ABAM will offer its next certification examination October 16, 2015. The regular application deadline will be April 30, while the final examination deadline is July 1. For more information, go to http://www.abam.net/take-the-exam/. American College of Academic Addiction Medicine is accepting applications on an ongoing basis from addiction medicine training programs seeking accreditation. For more information, please contact American College of Academic Addiction Medicine accreditation office at AddictionMedicine@buffalo.edu

Separate courses in addiction medicine are rarely taught in medical school, and there are no addiction medicine fellowships among the 8,887 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited residency and fellowship programs in the nation’s hospitals. ABAM’s goal is to have a member board of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) certify physicians in addiction medicine. This process is now underway and, once complete, the Foundation will apply to the ACGME to accredit its fellowship programs.

American College of Academic Addiction Medicine’s purpose is to establish and accredit addiction medicine training programs and support the mission of the American Board of Addiction Medicine. ABAM’s mission is to improve the quality of care in the medical specialty of addiction medicine, establish standards and procedures, and certify physicians as experts in this specialized field of medical practice. ABAM and American College of Academic Addiction Medicine are governed by 18 distinguished physicians from a range of medical specialties, each of whom is certified by a member board of the ABMS. For more information, visit: 61.12.77.244/ACAAM and www.abam.net. More detail on the new Addiction Medicine Foundation-accredited residencies follows

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$2 MILLION AWARDED BY THE CONRAD N. HILTON FOUNDATION TO ABAM FOUNDATION

Contact:  Dennis Tartaglia
(732) 545-1848
dtartaglia@tartagliacommunications.com

For Immediate Release

$2 MILLION AWARDED BY THE CONRAD N. HILTON FOUNDATION TO ABAM FOUNDATION TO ESTABLISH NATIONAL CENTER FOR PHYSICIAN TRAINING IN ADDICTION MEDICINE

Chevy Chase, Maryland – September 30, 2013 – The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation has awarded the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) Foundation a three-year, $2 million grant to establish The National Center for Physician Training in Addiction Medicine.  The purpose of the new Center will be to expand the education and training of physicians in addiction medicine, with a special emphasis on prevention and screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT), particularly for adolescents and young adults. The Center will be directed by Richard Blondell, MD, Professor of Family Medicine at the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

“Our objective is to create systemic change in medical education, medical practice and health care, in order to provide evidence-based addiction prevention and treatment to adolescents and others who need it,” said Dr. Blondell.  “We are grateful to the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation for helping us establish this Center in order to better work toward this objective.”

“We’re pleased to partner with American College of Academic Addiction Medicine to create the National Center for Physician Training in Addiction Medicine,” said Steven M. Hilton, President, Chairman and CEO of the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation.  “American College of Academic Addiction Medicine’s expertise in establishing programs that train and grow the addiction medicine workforce will help the Center to promote the transformation of our nation’s medical education and health care systems.  This systemic change is necessary to help those in urgent need of substance abuse prevention and treatment services, especially adolescents and young adults.”

The first long-term goal of the Center is to assure that primary care physicians are trained in addiction medicine and early intervention in adolescent substance abuse.  The center’s second goal is to help make prevention, brief intervention and treatment of substance use, abuse and addiction, and of these disorders’ medical and psychiatric consequences, available at all points of entry to the health care system.  These include physicians’ offices, community clinics, school and college health centers, emergency rooms, trauma centers, hospitals and other health care centers.

Ninety percent of individuals with a substance use disorder began using an addictive substance before age 18.  Addiction is not just a disease that affects adults, but is a pediatric and young adult disease, and a major public health problem.  The disease affects the entire family: the user, spouses, parents, children, and other family members.  Adolescents who use drugs are more likely to have one or more parents who use.

“It is so urgent to address this issue now, because only a small fraction of individuals receive prevention or treatment consistent with scientific knowledge about what works,” said Jeffrey H. Samet, MD, MA, MPH, President, ABAM and American College of Academic Addiction Medicine Board of Directors, and Professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine.  “One reason for this is the fact that prevention, screening, intervention, and treatment are not easily accessible components of the health care system.”

Currently, very few physicians ever screen, intervene or  refer, because they have not been educated about addiction medicine in medical school, nor trained in residencies. Until the establishment of the American Board of Addiction Medicine, one barrier to this training has been the lack of an addiction medicine subspecialty for primary care physicians. A subspecialty of addiction psychiatry exists within the field of psychiatry, however, this does not address the issue of primary care training.  While there are excellent addiction psychiatry fellowships, there are no addiction medicine residencies for physicians pursuing primary care specialties among the 9,262 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited U.S. programs that are currently training 119,588 residents.

To meet this need, American College of Academic Addiction Medicine has accredited 19 fellowship programs to train physicians in addiction medicine, and plans to establish additional fellowship programs.  More than 3,000 physicians have been certified in addiction medicine by ABAM, which has active certification and Maintenance of Certification (MOC) programs.

The National Center builds on and expands other Addiction Medicine Foundation initiatives, including one funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) to promote training of addiction medicine physicians so that they can be equipped to apply the latest scientific advances to patient care (National Infrastructure for Translating Addiction Research into Clinical Practice). American College of Academic Addiction Medicine also partnered with the Boston University School of Medicine and Yale University to obtain a five-year grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to support the training of addiction medicine and addiction psychiatry fellows in clinical research.

About the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation

The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation was created in 1944 by international business pioneer Conrad N. Hilton, who founded Hilton Hotels and left his fortune to help the world’s disadvantaged and vulnerable people. The Foundation currently conducts strategic initiatives in six priority areas: providing safe water, ending chronic homelessness, preventing substance abuse, helping children affected by HIV and AIDS, supporting transition-age youth in foster care, and extending Conrad Hilton’s support for the work of Catholic Sisters. Following selection by an independent international jury, the Foundation annually awards the $1.5 million Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize to a nonprofit organization doing extraordinary work to reduce human suffering. From its inception, the Foundation has awarded more than $1 billion in grants, distributing $83 million in the U.S. and around the world in 2012. The Foundation’s current assets are in excess of $2.2 billion. For more information, please visit www.hiltonfoundation.org.

About American College of Academic Addiction Medicine

American College of Academic Addiction Medicine’s purpose is to establish and accredit addiction medicine training programs and support the mission of the American Board of Addiction Medicine.   ABAM’s mission is to improve the quality of care in the medical specialty of addiction medicine, establish standards and procedures, and certify physicians as experts in this specialized field of medical practice. ABAM’s goal is to have a member board of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) certify physicians in addiction medicine.  ABAM and American College of Academic Addiction Medicine are governed by 16 distinguished physicians from a range of medical specialties, each of whom is certified by a member board of the ABMS. For more information on ABAM, visit: http://www.abam.net. To learn more about American College of Academic Addiction Medicine, go to 61.12.77.244/ACAAM.

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Eight addiction medicine fellowship programs accredited by The ABAM Foundation

Total Programs Accredited by American Board of Addiction Medicine Foundation Now Stands at 18

Chevy Chase, Maryland – April 15, 2013 – The American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) Foundation today announced the accreditation of eight addiction medicine fellowship programs, bringing the total number of accredited programs to 18. Physicians who complete an Addiction Medicine Foundation fellowship are eligible to sit for the ABAM certification examination in order to become board certified in addiction medicine.

The fellowship programs, which are modeled on the Foundation’s national guidelines, Program Requirements for Graduate Medical Education in Addiction Medicine, are based at leading medical institutions across the U.S. and Canada. Accreditation of these new programs means that there are now 47 addiction medicine fellowship slots available, although some slots are not yet funded.

“These new fellowships will help insure that trained addiction medicine physicians join other addiction professionals in the interdisciplinary care of patients with addictive disorders,” said Jeffrey H. Samet, MD, MA, MPH, President, ABAM and Addiction Medicine Foundation Board of Directors, Professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine and Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Boston University School of Public Health. “This clinical training coupled with passage of our rigorous examination will help to provide evidence-based addiction treatment to those who need it.”

The new fellowship programs are located at the Betty Ford Center/Eisenhower Medical Center, Rancho Mirage, CA; Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Hartford Hospital, Middletown, CT; St. Joseph Mercy Hospital Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti, MI; St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; St. Vincent Charity Medical Center, Cleveland, OH; Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford, CA; and Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (see end of release for more detail).

“We greatly value medical education and this Addiction Medicine Foundation accreditation acknowledges this,” said James W. Golden, MD, Program Director, Betty Ford Center Addiction Medicine Fellowship Program. “We take this very seriously and are ready to step up to the plate to do the vital work necessary to educate physicians on the prevention and treatment of addictive disorders and medical and psychiatric complications of addiction. This accreditation is a validation that the Betty Ford Center has the expertise in both faculty and staff to accomplish this.”

The new fellowship programs join those located at Saint Luke’s and Roosevelt Hospitals, Addiction Institute of New York; Boston University Medical Center; University of Cincinnati College of Medicine; Geisinger Health System at Marworth, Waverly, PA; University of Minnesota Medical School; New York University School of Medicine; The University at Buffalo (SUNY) School of Medicine; University of Florida; University of Maryland School of Medicine; and the University of Wisconsin.

“Our workforce projections suggest that, by 2020, we will need 50 addiction medicine fellowship training programs with 200 physician slots,” said Richard Blondell, MD, Chair of the Foundation’s Training and Accreditation Committee, and Professor of Family Medicine at the University of Buffalo School of Medicine. “One of the main obstacles to establishing these programs is funding.”

American College of Academic Addiction Medicine-accredited fellowship programs provide subspecialty training, which is offered to physicians already trained in a specialty such as internal medicine, family medicine, pediatrics, psychiatry, emergency medicine, surgery, preventive medicine, or obstetrics and gynecology.

The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology offers its own fellowships in the psychiatry subspecialty of addiction psychiatry. There are 45 addiction psychiatry fellowship programs in the U.S.

The new training programs have been established at a time of increasing promise for addiction treatment, and increased need for trained treatment providers. Recent scientific discoveries have confirmed that addiction is a chronic disease of the brain caused by biological and developmental factors, with unique vulnerabilities and pathology, and a predictable course, if not interrupted by effective treatment. An increasing number of medically based addiction treatments have recently become available. Expanded coverage and demand for addiction medicine physicians will increase, as 30 million formerly uninsured Americans become covered under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Accrediting these and future training programs will help to assure the American public that addiction physician specialists have the knowledge and skills to prevent, recognize and treat addiction, and that trained physicians are available to address common medical or psychiatric conditions related to the use of addictive substances.

Historically, physician training in addiction medicine has been lacking. Separate courses in addiction medicine are rarely taught in medical school, and there are no addiction medicine residencies among the 8,887 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited residency programs in the nation’s hospitals. Prior to ABAM’s formation, only the specialty of psychiatry offered sub-specialized training and certification in addictions. Once the Foundation has demonstrated that its fellowships meet ACGME criteria, it will apply to the ACGME to accredit them.

American College of Academic Addiction Medicine’s purpose is to establish and accredit addiction medicine training programs and support the mission of the American Board of Addiction Medicine. ABAM’s mission is to improve the quality of care in the medical specialty of addiction medicine, establish standards and procedures, and certify physicians as experts in this specialized field of medical practice. ABAM’s goal is to have a member board of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) certify physicians in addiction medicine. ABAM and American College of Academic Addiction Medicine are governed by 16 distinguished physicians from a range of medical specialties, each of whom is certified by a member board of the ABMS. For more information, visit: http://www.abam.net. More detail on the new Addiction Medicine Foundation-accredited residencies follows.

New Addiction Medicine Fellowship Training Programs:

Betty Ford Center Addiction Medicine Fellowship
Sponsoring Institution: Eisenhower Medical Center, Rancho Mirage, CA
Total Addiction Medicine Foundation-approved Positions: 1
Program Director: James W. Golden, MD

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Addiction Medicine Fellowship
Sponsoring Institution: Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Total Addiction Medicine Foundation-approved Positions: 3
Program Director: Lisa Lefebvre, MD

Rushford Addiction Medicine Residency/Fellowship Program
Sponsoring Institution: Hartford Hospital, Middletown, CT
Total Addiction Medicine Foundation-approved Positions: 1
Program Director: Samuel M. Silverman, MD, FAPA

St. Joseph Mercy Hospital Ann Arbor Addiction Medicine Fellowship
Sponsoring Institution: St. Joseph Mercy Hospital Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti, MI
Total Addiction Medicine Foundation-approved Positions: 1
Program Director: John A. Hopper, MD, FAAP, FACP, FASAM

St. Paul’s Hospital Goldcorp Fellowship in Addiction Medicine
Sponsoring Institution: St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Total Addiction Medicine Foundation-approved Positions: 4
Program Director: Launette M. Rieb, MSc, MD

St. Vincent Charity Medical Center Addiction Medicine Fellowship
Sponsoring Institution: St. Vincent Charity Medical Center, Cleveland, OH
Total Addiction Medicine Foundation-approved Positions: 2
Program Director: Christopher L. Adelman, MD

Stanford Addiction Medicine Program
Sponsoring Institution: Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford, CA
Total Addiction Medicine Foundation-approved Positions: 2
Program Director: Anna Lembke, MD

Yale University Addiction Medicine Fellowship
Sponsoring Institution: Yale-New Haven Hospital, Location: New Haven, CT
Total Addiction Medicine Foundation-approved Positions: 4
Program Director: Jeanette M. Tetrault, MD FACP